A Visual History of April O’Neil, Part 7: 2010 – 2014

agosto 7, 2014 at 6:13 pm (Anime, Comic Books, Film, TMNT, Whitewashing) (, , , , , )

TMNT (2014) set photos of Megan Fox as April O'Neil.

The year 2009 brought about a seismic shift to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: after twenty-five years as a mom-and-pop property–albeit a ridiculously successful one–the intellectual property was sold to Viacom, and more specifically Nickelodeon, an entity that would not, and did not, waste any time capitalizing upon it.  Only an entity like Nick could have been able to take a cartoon series that lasted six years and almost a hundred and fifty episodes and make it seem like a footnote in TMNT history, but that’s precisely what happened; with the turtles once again in comic book stores, tv screens and movie theaters, the last few years have been like 1991 all over again.

However, this is not, in fact, 1991, a time when Eastman and Laird were willing, if not always happy, to let almost anyone play with their toys: Nickelodeon appears to keep the turtles on a much shorter leash.  Even when characters like Karai get radically reinvented, it feels like a boundary exists; the turtles must not pass this point.  They can’t be radical, just Radical (TM).  Therefore it is not surprising to see that April is once again and three times over, a white woman.

More interesting for the purposes of this series is the fact that IDW Publishing’s license to create and publish TMNT books gave them the ability to reprint the old Mirage and Archie material, and that the company has thus been making books that were out of print for decades available once again.  More interesting still, the reprinted Mirage material, much of it originally in black and white, is being recolored, meaning that various colorists have been tasked with looking at the various looks of April O’Neil and drawing conclusions about  just what it was the original creators intended, and deciding whether or not they’ll stick to that original intent.

So yeah, lots to cover here.  One note before we begin, though: these images are organized in more or less chronological order, and while that’s easy enough to establish with the books, I’ve had to rely on some educated guesswork when it comes to the images relating to the cartoon and film.  So there’s that.

Part 1.

Part 2.

Part 3.

Part 4.

Part 5.

Part 6.

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A Visual History of April O’Neil, Part 6: Miscellanea

julio 7, 2014 at 9:13 pm (Racism, TMNT, Whitewashing) (, , , , , )

The woman here isn't April, but rather Lucindra, a character who appeared in a couple of non-canon TMNT stories.  Unlike with April, her race is a significant, if subtle, part of her characterization.  Note her skin color.

Note: Not April.

Before we head of to our exploration of the Nickelodeon era–with its three new (white) versions of April, and, more importantly given the subject matter of this series, IDW’s color reprints of old Mirage issues–I want to devote this section to some random stuff: additional images, information on related concepts, and clarifications on some of my thinking on the various topics dealt with here.

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Names, “Arrow”, Whitewashing

mayo 18, 2014 at 11:55 pm (Television, Whitewashing) (, , , , , , )

(With special thanks to Daggerpen.)

When the people behind Arrow cast The Killing’s Bex Taylor-Klaus on a recurring basis as The Canary’s best friend and confidant Sin, comic book fans called foul. The comic book character that inspired Taylor-Klaus’s role, Dinah Lance’s adopted daughter, had been a woman of color, born and raised in a village in Asia. The TV character was not.

Cute?

Bex Taylor-Klaus.  Cute?  Yes.   Fantastic in the role?  Sure.  Asian?  Not even a little bit.

If recent events are any indication, it may appear that the producers heard the criticism, but did not listen. Leer el resto de esta entrada »

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